THE CONCRETE BRIDGE MAGAZINE

WINTER 2010

ASPIRE is a quarterly magazine published by PCI in cooperation with the associations of the National Concrete Bridge Council. The editorial content focuses on the latest technology and key issues in the Concrete Bridge Industry.

Issue link: http://www.aspiremagazinebyengineers.com/i/306198

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F O C U S JSE worked under a design-build format to create the design for the Des Plaines River Valley Bridge on I-355 in Lemont, Ill. The bridge features a combination of 18 spans with simple pretensioned concrete beams and 17 spans with post-tensioned spliced girders over its 1.3-mile length. Photos: Illinois State Toll Highway Authority. Whether bread- and-butter bridges or long, complex structures and projects, concrete designs offer the best alternative by Craig A. Shutt In its nearly 30 years of operation, Janssen & Spaans Engineering Inc. (JSE) has created designs for a multitude of bridges, including some highly complex ones that have become its forte. Throughout that history, it has found one maxim to be true: Properly designed, a concrete bridge will outlast, outperform, and underbid any alternative. "Every time we perform cost-alternate studies or work on design-build projects with contractors estimating construction costs, we find that concrete superstructures are consistently more economical than the corresponding steel superstructure alternates." says Leo Spaans, founder and co-owner of Indianapolis-based JSE. "In addition to the upfront construction cost savings of concrete over steel, we have witnessed continued cost savings throughout the life of these structures. These savings result from lower maintenance requirements of concrete structures and better long-term durability." Over the years, this conclusion has been confirmed by a number of projects in which alternative designs were prepared. An example is the preparatory work completed for the Des Plaines River Valley Bridge on I-355 in Lemont, Ill. Created under a performance-based specification, the structure features 18 spans with simple precast, pretensioned concrete beams and 17 spans with post-tensioned spliced girders over its 1.3-mile length. The $125-million project, which includes 612 girders using three different depths, needed this combined approach to efficiently place piers in a complex terrain. (For more on this project, see the Spring 2008 issue of ASPIRE.™) ConCrete PhilosoPhy Drives Janssen & spaans 8 | ASPIRE , Winter 2010 ASPIRE_Winter10.indb 8 12/18/09 2:00:42 PM

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